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Stop!! Wells Fargo Bank Loans to Chile

ID Number: 8139
Maker: Malaquías Montoya
Technique: silkscreen
Date Made: 1979
Place Made: North America: United States; California, Oakland
Measurements: 36.8 cm x 58.4 cm; 14 1/2 in x 23 in
Main Subject: Chile (Latin America: South America)
Materials: paper (fiber product)
Digitized: Y

Full Text:
Stop!! Wells Fargo Bank Loans to Chile "They Have A Legend To Live Up To" $155 million to the Chilean Military Junta to finance repression in Chile: 40,000 killed 2500 Disappeared 1 Million Exiled 1 out of 10 Chileans Forced Into Exile Outlawed All Human & Democratic Rights Join Us - Withdrawal Day April 17, 1979 Leaflet Wells Fargo Banks Transfer Your Accounts Info: Free Chile Center, bay area 415/ 433-6698-6055. san jose 408/ 295 7349. san diego 714/ 453-9164. los angeles 1979 Malaquías Montoya [pencil date and signature]


Acquisition Number: 1991-067

Notes:
Artists responded when a U.S.–backed military coup overthrew the democratically elected government of Chile in 1973. Boycotts were invoked against products from Chile and U.S. business institutions that continued to negotiate and trade with Chile. In Stop Wells Fargo Bank Loans to Chile (1979), Malaquías Montoya used the bank’s trademark stagecoach, symbol of a romanticized and heroicized U.S. past, to call attention to their unheroic financial support of the Chilean military junta. In addition to listing the atrocities committed in Chile, this poster promoted direct sanctions against the bank by announcing a “withdrawal day” when people would transfer their accounts. In the context of this poster, it is important to note that Wells Fargo was one of the few U.S. banks to refuse to do business with South Africa in the 1980s. One can but speculate that the unfavorable public attention directed towards Wells Fargo in the 1970s alerted them to the dangers of continuing to support governments whose abuses attracted wide international attention. [from "Just Another Poster" catalogue essay titled "La Lucha Sigue", by Carol Wells, 2002


Copyright Status:
Copyright status unknown; may be protected by copyright law; used by CSPG with permission.


Exhibition Annotation:
Following the 1973 Chilean coup, activists called for boycotts of Chilean products and U.S. businesses that continued to trade with Chile’s military dictatorship. In this poster, Malaquías Montoya used Wells Fargo’s trademark stagecoach, symbol of a romanticized and heroic U.S. past, to call attention to its unheroic financial support of the Chilean military junta. In addition to listing the atrocities committed in Chile, the poster promoted direct sanctions against the bank by announcing a “withdrawal day” on which date people were asked to transfer their accounts to other institutions. This campaign generated a great deal of negative attention for Wells Fargo and may be one reason the bank agreed to cease doing business with apartheid South Africa in the 1980s.



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