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Destruction

ID Number: 2733
Maker: Leichhardt Anti-Expressway Committee
Technique: silkscreen
Date Made: early 1970s
Place Made: Australia: Sydney
Measurements: 76 cm x 51 cm; 29 15/16 in x 20 1/16 in
Main Subject: Housing
Materials: paper (fiber product)
Digitized: Y

Full Text:
Destruction this house with 1/6 of Glebe, will be destroyed to make way for the already outmoded, disastrous North Western Expressway Authorised By Leichhardt Anti-Expressway Committee


Acquisition Number: 1995-028

Notes:
Anglican Church owned what was called the "Glebe Estate" and they wanted to sell it off, part of which was to be used for an expressway that was never built. (referenced in this poster) The large red "X" refers to houses marked for demolition in the Glebe Estates, a suburb of Sydney, Australia. The devil ironically refers to the Anglican Church, owner of the property since the late 18th century, when Sydney was founded as a penal colony. The Glebe Estates includes the historic waterfront area known as "The Rocks," where the prisoners first landed. The Glebe Estate had become a low-income working class neighborhood, and the Anglican Church decided to sell it. Part of the property was to be used for an expressway that would have obliterated 25,000 homes through Glebe and nearby communities including Leichhardt. Expensive homes and shops were planned for "The Rocks" area. The Leichhardt Anti-Expressway Committee, including politicians and grass roots community members, formed to oppose the sale. They were so successful educating residents and organizing demonstrations, that the church was embarrassed and stopped the sale. The expressway was never built.


Copyright Status:
Copyright status unknown; may be protected by copyright law.


Exhibition Annotation:
The large red "X" refers to houses marked for demolition in the Glebe Estates, a suburb of Sydney, Australia. The devil refers to the Anglican Church, owner of the property since the late 18th century, when Sydney was founded as a penal colony. The Glebe Estates includes the historic waterfront area known as "The Rocks," where the prisoners first landed. The area had become a low-income working class neighborhood, and the Anglican Church decided to sell it. Part of the property was to be used for an expressway that would have obliterated 25,000 homes through Glebe and nearby communities including Leichhardt. Expensive homes and shops were planned for "The Rocks" area. The Leichhardt Anti-Expressway Committee, including politicians and grass roots community members, formed to oppose the sale. They were so successful educating residents and organizing demonstrations, that the church was embarrassed and stopped the sale. The expressway was never built.



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