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You Can't Convert a Man Because You Have Silenced Him

ID Number: 10954
Maker: George Pennewell; The Print Mint
Technique: offset
Date Made: 1971
Place Made: North America: United States; California, San Francisco
Measurements: 76 cm x 50.5 cm; 29 15/16 in x 19 7/8 in
Main Subject: African Americans; Political Prisoners; Viet Nam War Era
Materials: glossy paper (fiber product); wrapped, corners
Digitized: Y

Full Text:
"You Can't Convert A Man-- Because You Have Silenced Him" Freedom To All Political Prisoners 1971 Geo. Pennewell (c) 1971 The Print Mint


Acquisition Number: 1995-056

Notes:
Bobby Seale is an African American activist who co-founded the Black Panther Party (BPP) with Huey P. Newton in 1966. He was one of the original “Chicago Eight” defendants charged with conspiracy and inciting to riot, in the wake of the 1968 Democratic National Convention in Chicago. During the trial, one of Seale's many outbursts led the judge to have him bound and gagged, which is the subject of this poster. Although the evidence against him was slim, he was sentenced to four years of imprisonment for contempt because of his outbursts and was eventually tried separately –and the “Chicago Eight” become the “Chicago Seven.” The jury was unable to reach a verdict in Seale's trial, and the charges were eventually dropped. He was released from prison in 1972. Seale underwent extensive FBI surveillance as part of its Counter Intelligence Program, known as COINTELPRO.


Copyright Status:
Under copyright; used by CSPG for educational and research purposes only. Distribution or reproduction beyond that allowed by fair use requires the written permission of the copyright owners.


Exhibition Annotation:
Bobby Seale is an African American activist who co-founded the Black Panther Party (BPP) with Huey P. Newton in 1966. He underwent extensive FBI surveillance as part of its Counter Intelligence Program, known as COINTELPRO. Seale was one of the original “Chicago Eight” defendants charged with conspiracy and inciting to riot, in the wake of the 1968 Democratic National Convention in Chicago. During the trial, one of Seale's many outbursts led Judge Julius Kaufman to have him bound and gagged, which is the subject of this poster. Although the evidence against him was slim, Seale was sentenced to four years in prison for contempt because of his outbursts and was eventually tried separately–and the “Chicago Eight” become the “Chicago Seven.” The jury was unable to reach a verdict in Seale's trial, the charges were eventually dropped and he was released from prison in 1972. Seale underwent extensive FBI surveillance as part of its Counter Intelligence Program, known as COINTELPRO.



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