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Let's Get It Together

ID Number: 6696
Maker: Gerta Katz; Another Mother for Peace
Technique: offset
Date Made: 1971
Place Made: North America: United States; California, Beverly Hills
Measurements: 56.5 cm x 13.9 cm; 22 1/4 in x 5 1/2 in
Main Subject: Viet Nam War Era; Peace (Anti-War)
Materials: paper (fiber product)
Digitized: Y

Full Text:
War is not healthy for children and other living things ® War is not healthy for children and other living things ® We've been to the moon -- Now let's get it together here on earth!


Acquisition Number: 1996-030

Notes:
text on verso


Copyright Status:
Under copyright; used by CSPG for educational and research purposes only. Distribution or reproduction beyond that allowed by fair use requires the written permission of the copyright owners.


Exhibition Annotation:
Dark blue background In 1965, Lorraine Schneider, an activist, artist, and mother, created the War is Not Healthy slogan and image for a design contest at Pratt Art Institute in New York. No submissions could be larger than 4 square inches, or 2" by 2." Her image was seen as too simplistic and did not win, but it became one of the most famous political graphics of the era. In 1967, 15 middle class women met at the Beverly Hills home of Barbara Avedon, television screen-writer and peace activist, to discuss “doing something” about the war in Viet Nam. Another Mother for Peace (AMP) was formed. Avedon later wrote, We were not ‘bearded sandaled youths,’ ‘wild-eyed radicals’ or dyed in the wool ‘old line freedom fighters’ and we wanted the Congress to know that they were dealing with an awakening and enraged middle class…We decided to send a [very ‘lady-like’]Mother’s Day card to Washington. It was a collaborative effort. Lorraine Schneider donated her etching for the face of the card, Dorothy Jones did the research, Barbara Avedon wrote the words and AMP designer, Gerta Katz did the distinctive calligraphy and layout. The card said, For my Mother’s Day gift of this year, I don’t want candy or flowers. I want an end to killing. We who have given life must be dedicated to preserving it. Please talk peace. A first printing quickly sold out, as did a second of 5000. Eventually 200,000 cards were sold, and members of Congress were flooded with them. For 18 years, Gerta Katz was art director for Another Mother for Peace. During this time she incorporated Lorraine Schneider’s logo into posters, flyers, newsletters, datebooks, buttons, cards, and jewelry, helping to promote it into an internationally recognized symbol for peace.