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Chicano Moratorium

ID Number: 9298
Maker: Ramses Noriega
Technique: silkscreen
Date Made: 1970
Place Made: United States: California, Los Angeles
Measurements: 72 cm x 57 cm; 28 3/8 in x 22 7/16 in
Main Subject: Chicano/Latino
Materials: paper (fiber product)
Digitized: Y

Full Text:
Chicano Moratorium Rosalio Muñoz, anti-war leader sponsored by brown berets Sat. August 29, 1970 10 am Meet at Belvedere Park - 3rd Street & Fetterley March on Atlantic Blvd.. then east on Whittier Blvd. to ... Laguna Park, 3864 E. Whittier Blvd 1 pm Rally Bring Our Carnales Home! National Chicano Moratorium Committee 4629 E. Brooklyn 268-7725


Acquisition Number: 1994-010

Notes:
The Chicano Moratorium, formally known as the National Chicano Moratorium Committee, was a movement of Chicano anti-war activists that built a broad-based but fragile coalition of Mexican-American groups to organize opposition to the Vietnam War. Led by activists from local colleges and members of the "Brown Berets", a group with roots in the high school student movement that staged walkouts in 1968, the coalition peaked with an August 29, 1970 march in East Los Angeles that drew an estimated 30,000 to 50,000 demonstrators. The artist was a founder of the Chicano Moratorium. The poster features Rosalio Muñoz, Student Body President of UCLA and co-chair of the Chicano Moratorium. Muñoz had refused induction on September 16, 1969.


Copyright Status:
Public domain.


Exhibition Annotation:
The Chicano Moratorium, formally known as the National Chicano Moratorium Committee, was a movement of Chicano anti war activists that built a broad based but fragile coalition of Mexican American groups to organize opposition to the Viet Nam War. Led by activists from local colleges and members of the Brown Berets, a group with roots in the high school student movement that staged walkouts in 1968, the coalition peaked with the first National Chicano Moratorium on August 29, 1970 in East Los Angeles that drew an estimated 30,000 to 50,000 demonstrators. A police riot following the peaceful march resulted in many injuries, more than 150 arrests and four deaths, including Gustav Montag, Lyn Ward, José Diaz, and award-winning journalist Rubén Salazar, news director of the local Spanish television station and columnist for the Los Angeles Times. Many continue to insist that Salazar was intentionally murdered because of his ongoing examination of rampant racism and police abuse within the LAPD and LA County Sheriff’s Department. The artist was a founder of the Chicano Moratorium, and the poster features Rosalío Muñoz, the first Chicano student body president of the University of California at Los Angeles (UCLA). In 1969, Muñoz refused induction and burned his draft card in protest over Chicano casualties in Viet Nam. In 1970, he was co chair of the Chicano Moratorium



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